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LEMMON HIGH SCHOOL CLASS OFFERING DESCRIPTIONS

 

SCIENCE

Life Science continueS building the base of knowledge in the area of life science that was started in the elementary grades. Life science focuses on the following four areas throughout the course of the year; 1. Ecology and the Environment 2. Cells and Heredity 3. The Diversity of Living Things and 4. The Human Body. Gaining knowledge in these four areas will prepare students for high school biology classes and give a basic understanding about themselves and other life and how this life interacts with the environment.

 

Chemistry is the study of physical and chemical properties of atoms.  This is a math-based lab study of how chemistry evolved, how atoms are similar yet different, how atoms bond to form molecules and compounds, and methods of computing chemical reactions.  Additionally, the students will practice safe and proper lab procedures.

 

Biology is an introduction to the study of life and the basic definition and structure of life.  The course including biomes and environments, cell theory, cell types and function, genetics and heredity, evolution theory of life forms, and different types of life as formed on Earth.  Additionally, the students will practice safe and proper lab procedures.

 

Physical Science is an introductory study of matter and energy and the way the universe behaves.  It usually deals with non-living systems.  Students will get and introduction to the physics of the universe such as motion, energy transfer and natural laws.  They will also be introduced to the atom and the way atoms combine, their physical identities and interactions between atoms.  The student will be able to explain why something happens in nature.  Additionally, the students will practice safe and proper lab procedures.

 

Physics is an introduction to the topic of Mechanics including Newton's Laws of motion, vectors, work and energy transfer.  Time allowing thermal energy, waves and light will be covered.  Additional information and online tutoring will be offered through PhysicsClassroom.com.  Physics utilizes geometry, trigonometry and algebra to solve engineering and practical situations.  Additionally, the students will practice safe and proper lab procedures.

 

Aeronautics is the science or art involved with the study, design, and manufacturing of air flight capable machines, and the techniques of operating aircraft and rockets within the atmosphere.  The students will study the history of flight, functions of aircraft design and control, actual flight and systems affecting flight such as weather, navigation, and pilot training. 

 

ENGISH/LANGUAGE ARTS/SPEECH

Speech (semester)  is a public speaking course for 10th graders to enable students, through practice, to develop communication skills that can be used in a variety of speaking situations. Oral and nonverbal communication skills are addressed through prepared and impromptu presentations. Topics may include (but are not limited to) research and organization, writing for verbal delivery, stylistic choices, visual and presentation skills, analysis and critique, and development of self-confidence.

 

MS ELA (elective) - Students will apply language arts skills to social sciences. They will use the scope of social science to read historical fiction, study current events through watching and reading the news, and take part in various multistep projects. 

 

Course Code     Course Name        Course Description

01001
English Language Arts I
"English/Language Arts I (9th grade) courses build upon students' prior knowledge of grammar, vocabulary, word usage, and the mechanics of writing and usually include the four aspects of language use: reading, writing, speaking, and listening. Typically, these courses introduce and define various genres of literature, with writing exercises often linked to reading selections."
01035Language Arts, Grade 7"Language Arts (grade 7) courses build upon students' prior knowledge of grammar, vocabulary, word usage, and the mechanics of writing, and include the four aspects of language use: reading, writing, speaking, and listening. Beyond emphasizing different uses for language, these courses may also include using language (particularly written text) to construct meaning and connections. Specific content depends upon state standards for grade 7."
01054American Literature"American Literature courses focus upon commonly known American authors and their work. Students improve their critical-thinking skills as they determine the underlying assumptions and values within the selected works and as they understand how the literature reflects the society of the time. Oral discussion is an integral part of literature courses, and written compositions are often required."
01102English Composition III and IV"English/Composition (juniors and seniors) courses are designed for juniors and/or seniors and build upon previous writing skills. Reinforcing the logic and critical-thinking skills that accompany good writing, these courses—which emphasize word choice, usage, and writing mechanics—provide continued and advanced instruction in writing for a variety of purposes and audiences. English/Composition (juniors and seniors) courses may emphasize college or business preparation; literature study may be offered as an additional component in which students analyze examples of several genres."
05189Grades 5-8 Art

"Art... course provides to students activities that foster creative expression, communication through artistic endeavor, and appreciation of culture and heritage. Activities may include those that enable students to refine their technique, increase their artistic vocabulary, express themselves and their world view, make connections to other content areas, develop their own aesthetic, and strengthen their critical abilities… typically involving the visual arts (drawing, painting, sculpture, crafts, and the like)."

"General courses involve content that is not grade differentiated and may apply to a range of consecutive grades."

11101Journalism"Journalism courses (typically associated with the production of a school newspaper, yearbook, or literary magazine) emphasize writing style and technique as well as production values and organization. Journalism courses introduce students to the concepts of newsworthiness and press responsibility; develop students' skills in writing and editing stories, headlines, and captions; and teach students the principles of production design, layout, and printing. Photography, photojournalism, and digital technology skills may be included."

 

* Course descriptions cited from "South Dakota Common Course Codes (updated November 20, 2019)" found on the South Dakota Department of Education website. https://doe.sd.gov/contentstandards/commoncourse.aspx

 

8th Grade Language Arts - Students will read and analyze various stories from the textbook, as well as other whole class literature such as "The Inventions of Hugo Cabret."  Students study and apply weekly vocabulary words. Grammar requirements are taught in conjunction with textual readings and as stand- alone activities (bell ringers, etc), as required by Common Core Standards.  Students learn to use conventions that drive their essays.  (Characters, settings, etc.)  Students complete a poetry unit and learn to present their poetry.   Students complete units on persuasion in writing, speech, and advertising (Shark Tank activity).  Students complete a unit on writing and presenting research. One Silent Reading book of the student's choosing is required per quarter.  Students then present a book talk, book menu project, or reader's response.

 

10th Grade Language Arts – Students complete a semester of creative writing projects beginning with a unit reviewing the 6 traits of good writing and a personal narrative essay.  Students then read several short stories followed by various creative writing assignments.  Students complete a whole class reading of "The Time Machine," followed by reports, posters, and presentations. A unit on "twisted fairytales" wraps up the semester.  Students then complete a semester of literature analysis, with an emphasis on British Literature.  A unit on "Beowulf" includes reading, writing, viewing "The 13th Warrior," and a Herot Hall experience. This is followed an analysis of a historical essay, leading into Chaucer's "Canterbury Tales," and intense character analysis projects and skits. Chivalry is discussed in the study of King Arthur and "Sir Gawain and the Green Night."  A unit on Monarchy and the writings of Queen Elizabeth I include comparison/contrast studies include the Monarch's role with leaders of today. The class completes a reading of excerpts and activities from Macbeth and Jane Eyre.  The semester closes with circle readings from the modern era and projects with an emphasis on various technology.  Vocabulary and grammar is included throughout the year on a regular basis through MUG Shot Mondays, Lit Term Tuesdays, and Words on Wednesday.

 

12th Grade Language Arts – Semester 1 will have a concentration on World Literature, and students will study story-telling from the beginning of time.  Students will read pieces from ancient civilizations, beginning with Mesopotamian, Egyptian, and Hebrew.  The students will read the Battle of Gilgamesh and complete a writing project.  Several styles of poetry will be discussed and students will write poetry of their own.  Passages from the Bible and from the Koran will be researched and discussed.  Guest speakers will visit during these units, such as the study of Chinese literature and culture. Indian literature will be analyzed in relation to the many religious sects.  Students will write their own fables and share them with the elementary school.  The first semester will close with an extensive reading and analysis of the book "Night," by Elie Wiesel, a survivor of the Holocaust.  Semester 2 will have a concentration on writing styles and essays, as well a senior research paper.  World Literature will continue in the form of Literature Circles and projects.

 

FOREIGN LANGUAGE

Spanish I begins with introductory phrases and questions. Students will learn numbers, colors, time, weather, and basic information about themselves. Students will learn 30-40 adjectives and will be able to describe themselves and others.  Students will discuss what they like and what they don't like. Verb conjugating will begin with forms of ser and ir and eventually become a list of 25-30 Spanish I verbs.  Students will able to talk about their school schedule, places in their school, and school supplies.  Students will research and do projects about Spain, Puerto Rico, Costa Rica, and the state of Texas.  They will view the movie The Alamo and write about the importance of the characters involved. The year will close with a study of family members and the creation of a Spanish family tree.  Teaching methods will include movies, texts, translations, games, music, individual white boards, scavenger hunts, power points, etc.

 

Spanish II begins with a review of Spanish I concepts and then began a unit on housing, furniture, and real estate.  Students will draw and label Spanish blueprints, create a Spanish Real Estate ad, and go visit a home with a local real estate agent.  Students will learn about and prepare food and visit a Mexican restaurant, after mastering an order and paying a bill in Spanish. Anatomy, discussing you daily routine and good health are taught using skits, DVDS, and posters.  Units on shopping (including an annual fashion show) and travel are taught during 4th quarter.  A unit on Don Quijote includes translating a graphic novel, completing a project, and viewing Man of La Mancha.  Two more short novels are translated during the year. Past tense, future tense, reflexive verbs, and command forms are part of Spanish II curriculum.  

 

BUSINESS/COMPUTERS

Computer Applications 9 (semester) helps students acquire knowledge of and experience in the proper and efficient use of previously written software packages (ex. Microsoft and Google) for more effective communication and increased productivity.  This course explores a wide range of applications, including (but not limited to) word-processing, spreadsheet, presentation, graphics, and database programs.

CS Discoveries (year) is for students in grades 9th - 10th grades. Computer Science Discoveries is an introductory, hands-on computer science course. The curriculum (plugged and unplugged) emphasizes problem-solving, creation, and collaboration, while introducing students to the many ways computer science impacts their lives.  Students will be introduced to:

  • HTML and CSS languages while building a personal web page in Web Lab
  • JavaScript language while creating an interactive game with animations in Game Lab
  • Developing an App prototype and creating the App in App Lab
  • ASCII and Binary Data Types
  • Using App Lab and Adafruit's Circuit Playground to develop programs with inputs and outputs of modern smart devices.

 

CS Principles (year) is an introductory, hands-on computer science course for students in grades 11-12. The curriculum (plugged and unplugged) introduces students to the foundational concepts of computer science and challenges them to explore how computing and technology can impact the world.  Students will learn about:

  • Bionary and ASCII data types, IP addressing, routing and Domain Name System (DNS) using the Internet Simulator
  • Compressed data, image representation, and the advantages and disadvantages of different file formats.
  • Top-down design strategies to solve problems
  • Encryption and cryptography, cyber security
  • Programming

     

Personal Finance  is for seniors and will provide a foundational understanding for making informed personal financial decisions leading to financial independence.

Senior Experience Capstone calls upon students to use skills they have acquired and practiced throughout formal education. It will take them out of their comfort zones, preparing them for life beyond high school. Youth internships allow students to gain authentic, real-world experience in business and industry. Students' interests, strengths, and chosen career clusters/pathways determine the internship experience

 

CTE CLASSES

Food Science is a course designed to provide students with an overview of food science and its importance to producers and consumers. Classroom and laboratory content will be enhanced by utilizing a cooking lab.

 

Advanced Animal Science will address the advanced knowledge and skills necessary to care for and meet the needs of animals, along with soft skills necessary for careers in the Agriculture, Food and Natural Resources sector. Topics covered include: animal health care practices, nutrition management, reproductive practices, medical terminology, animal classification, and some surgical techniques.

 

Natural Resources provides students with an overview of the planet's natural resource systems, along with examining those resources unique to South Dakota. Students will explore and develop a basic understanding of how the systems relate to one another other.

 

Ag Structures Technology addresses the technical and industrial skills and techniques related to Power, Structural, & Technical Systems within South Dakota. This class is offered to help students build basic knowledge and skills in the area of technology, agricultural mechanics, and welding.

Intro to Building Classes are designed to increase student's knowledge, skills and techniques in a woodworking shop setting.  Students will demonstrate their understanding of shop safety in any work setting.

Classroom course work will re-introduce safety procedures when using hand woodworking tools and woodworking machines while learning woodworking techniques, and basic mechanical drafting procedures.  Shop activities will be centered on skills demonstrated on a variety of woodworking tasks, woodworking machines, and with the use of different woodworking  processes in order to achieve successful completion of assigned  projects.

Through-out these processes students will continue to develop creativity, personal pride in their work, and an appreciation of fine craftsmanship.  As students increase their skill levels they will develop habits of safety while learning that critical thinking is necessary to successfully work in any shop environment. 

An introduction and safe practice will be taught on the operation and care of different woodworking power tools.  Such tools are as listed:  (power miter saws, bench table saws, drill presses, planners, routers, disc sanders, jointers, band saws, jig saws, as well as many woodworking hand tools).

Students will also develop and practice positive work ethic skills which are much needed in the real-work work force.

LEARING TARGETS

  • Develop a lifelong attitude of Safety First when in a work shop and construction environment.
  • Determine different types of wood species and common uses.
  • Develop skills and techniques of wood working and building construction.
  • Understand and apply mathematical functions associated with wood working.
  • Develop the principle elements of drafting and design.
  • Develop positive work ethic practices

 

Junior High Woodworking helps students gain an understanding of the wood working processes and to develop skills and techniques to design and produce wood projects.  Students will learn the primary focus of working in a wood shop, focusing on Safety First, before they are introduced to hand tools and certain power tools prior to producing wood projects. 

An introduction and practice will be given on the safe operation and care of different hand and power wood working tools.  Students will develop skills in:  basic drafting skills, measuring, identifying types of wood species and characteristics, cutting and fitting wood, filing and sanding, and staining and finishing.

In this process students will develop creativity, personal pride in their work, and an appreciation of fine craftsmanship.

Students will also develop and practice positive work ethic skills which are much needed in the real-work work force.

LEARING Middle School Agriculture, Food and Natural Resources allows students to study a variety of agricultural topics throughout the six Agriculture, Food, and Natural Resources pathways. It serves as an introduction to much of the coursework included within the AFNR cluster.

 TARGETS

  • Develop a lifelong attitude of Safety First when in a work shop and construction environment.
  • Determine different types of wood species and common uses.
  • Develop skills and techniques of wood working.
  • Understand and apply mathematical functions associated with wood working.
  • Develop the principle elements of drafting and design.
  • Develop positive work ethic practices

 

Middle School Agriculture, Food and Natural Resources allows students to study a variety of agricultural topics throughout the six Agriculture, Food, and Natural Resources pathways. It serves as an introduction to much of the coursework included within the AFNR cluster.

 

HEALTH/PHYSICAL EDUCATION

7th/8th grade Physical Education classes provide students with opportunities that meet state standards.  The course provides students with the opportunity to learn a variety of activities and sport related movements as well as health and fitness concepts. Health topics relate to nutrition, fitness health and wellness. Emphasis is placed on active participation and positive social interaction during fitness and sport activities.

 

Health class focuses on the mental/emotional, social, and physical components that affect youth today. It is the goal of the class to educate students on how to live a healthy, productive life right now and beyond high school, how their decisions today affect their future health, and how the health of the mind and body affect every aspect of life.

 

High School Recreational Education gets students active. Lifetime skills will be presented. Students are expected to be participants, assume leadership roles at times, and practice good sportsmanship. Individual skills and team skills will be a part of the class, the weather will also play a role in what we will be able to accomplish. Games/skills will include but may not be limited to; chess, bocce ball, badminton, archery, bowling, volleyball, frisbee golf, weightlifting, soccer, horseshoes, fishing and basketball. The skills presented are to hopefully have students be interested in these activities outside of school and after they leave high school.

 

SOCIAL SCIENCE

7th Social Studies Students study the five themes of geography and apply them to various regions from the world. They will look closely at how the culture of a region is dependent on physical and human relationships. 

 

8th Grade Social Studies provides 8th graders the opportunity to build their base of knowledge of United States based on three strands: history, civics/government, and economics. The history starts when historians first think people migrated to North America through the effects of the civil war. During this journey, students are presented with information pertaining to our government and other governments around the world, we research principles and purposes of governments, conflict with other nations, and economics.

 

World Geography students will study various regions of the world. To each of those regions, they will apply the five themes of geography to understand the diversity that makes up the world we live in. Students will also use geospatial tools to interpret this information. Students will learn about various cultures from throughout the world and the relationship between the physical and human worlds and the historical and continuing effects of this relationship. 

 

World History students will study major global events that have occurred dating back to the Renaissance, Reformation, Scientific Revolution, and Enlightenment and continuing through World War II.  

 

US History students will study United States history from the Revolutionary War and Constitutional framework all the way through the Cold War. Students will be asked to examine the intricacies and standing impact of the significant events that happened in US History. Students will also be asked to study the relationship between these events.

 

US Government students will study American government at all levels; federal, state, and local. The will take a comprehensive look at the founding documents, the three branches of government, the importance and significance of American citizenship, and the law-making process.

 

Street Law students will study the historical backgrounds of government and laws. They will analyze and interpret various types of laws; we will also go through the proceedings of a trial and all that corresponds with it. 

 

MATHEMATICS

7th grade mathematics prepares students for a deep understanding of mathematical concepts after the Everyday Math Elementary curriculum. Math Course 2 focuses on 4 areas; 1. Developing understanding of applying proportional relationships 2. Operations with rational numbers and working with expressions and linear equations 3. Solving problems involving scale drawings, geometric constructions, and surface area, and volume 4. Drawing inferences about populations. The mathematical concepts addressed in this curriculum will help students to become successful problem solvers and use math effectively in everyday life.

 

8th grade Mathematics students will use linear equations and systems of linear equations to represent, analyze, and solve a variety of problems. Students will also learn the concept of functions. They will learn the definition of a function and how to convert among representations of functions. Thirdly, students will analyze two- and three-dimensional figures using space, angle, similarity, and congruence and apply the Pythagorean Theorem.

 

Algebra 1 students will extend the mathematics that they learned in the middle school years. Students will analyze and explain how to solve equations and will write, interpret, and translate between different forms of equations and inequalities. Students will extend their knowledge about functions and learn function notation and the concept of domain and range. Students will also extend their knowledge of integer exponents.

 

Geometry students will learn more precise definitions from what they learned in elementary and middle school and will learn how to develop proofs. Concepts that students will learn in more detail are: congruence, similarity, symmetry, transformations. Students will also be introduced to right triangle trigonometry and will learn about sine, cosine, and tangent.

 

Algebra 2 students will extend their function knowledge. In previous courses, students have learned about linear, quadratic, and exponential functions and now they will learn polynomial, rational, and radical functions. Students will observe similarities between the operations of integers and the operations of polynomials.

 

Trigonometry students will extend the right triangle trigonometry previous learned in geometry. Students will prove and apply trigonometric identities, extend the domain of trigonometric functions using the unit circle, and apply trigonometry to general triangles.

 

Precalculus students will use concepts they learned in trigonometry, geometry, and algebra. Students will learn about complex numbers, rational functions, inverse functions, vectors, matrices, parametric and polar equations, logarithmic functions, and exponential functions. 


FINE ARTS

H.S. Art Class

Lemmon High School Art Class is designed to provide a foundation in Art that meets state standards and satisfies the Art graduation requirements. Emphasis is placed on understanding the Elements of Art and Principles of Design as a basis for composition. Students will explore a variety of art processes and materials such as drawing, painting, stippling, scratch art, printmaking, as well as two & three-dimensional design. Student artwork will reflect aesthetics & cultural and historical contexts. Willingness to get involved in the creative process is a more important requirement than the student's talent or previous experience.

 

7th / 8th grade Art

Lemmon Jr. High Art classes provide students with opportunities that meet state standards. The schools Jr. High Art Classes emphasize the introduction of the Elements of Art and Principles of Design. Students will explore a variety of art processes and materials such as drawing, painting, stippling, scratch art, as well as two & three-dimensional design. Willingness to get involved in the creative process is a more important requirement than the student's talent or previous experience.